What is thunderstorm asthma?

During grass pollen season people may notice an increase in asthma and hay fever. Grass pollen season also brings the chance of thunderstorm asthma.

Thunderstorm asthma is thought to be triggered by a unique combination of high grass pollen counts and a certain type of thunderstorm. For people who have asthma or hay fever this can cause severe asthma symptoms, making it difficult to breath. When a large number of people develop asthma symptoms over a short period of time, this is known as epidemic thunderstorm asthma. These epidemic thunderstorm asthma events don't happen every year but when they do, they can happen during grass pollen season, which is normally from October through December. 

Learn more about thunderstorm asthma. Find a community education session near you. 

Who is at risk?

Thunderstorm asthma can affect those with asthma or hay fever - especially people who experience wheezing or coughing with their hay fever.  That’s why it’s important for people with asthma or hay fever to know about thunderstorm asthma and what they can do to help protect themselves during grass pollen season. Even if you don't think you have asthma or hay fever, don't ignore symptoms like wheezing or shortness of breath - check with your GP.  

Learn more about asthma and hay fever.   

Watch the video below to learn more about thunderstorm asthma

View an accessible version of this video or read the transcript.

woman in park

Community education sessions 

From 4 September 2017, Asthma Australia is holding community information sessions on thunderstorm asthma in communities throughout Victoria.

Find a session near you

How can I protect myself if I have asthma or hay fever?

Your GP will help you to develop an up-to-date asthma action plan to manage your asthma.

Here are some things you can do to prepare for pollen season:

  • If you've ever had asthma – talk to your GP about what you can do to help protect yourself from the risk of thunderstorm asthma this pollen season. Remember taking an asthma preventer properly and regularly is key to preventing asthma, including thunderstorm asthma.
  • If you experience wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness or continuing coughing then you may have asthma. It’s important you talk to your GP and get it checked out. 
  • If you have hay fever – see your pharmacist or GP for a hay fever treatment plan and check if you should have an asthma reliever puffer – which is available from a pharmacy without a prescription.
  • If you have hay fever, and especially if you experience wheezing and coughing with your hay fever, it is important to make sure you don’t also have asthma. Speak to your GP today about whether or not you might have asthma.

And finally, where possible avoid being outside during thunderstorms from October through December – especially in the wind gusts that come before the storm. Go inside and close your doors and windows. If you have your air conditioning on, turn it onto recirculate.

If you develop asthma symptoms, follow your asthma action plan, or if you don’t have one yet, follow the four steps of asthma first aid.

Download the Vic Emergency app and set up a 'watch zone' for your location to receive advice and warnings about potential epidemic thunderstorm asthma events during the grass pollen season. You can also visit the Vic Emergency thunderstorm asthma webpage for updates and information too.

Learn about asthma first aid

It's important for everyone in the community to know the four steps of asthma first aid so they know what to do if they or someone is having an asthma attack.

Resources

4 steps of asthma first aid

A poster - 4 steps of asthma first aid is available in Amharic, Arabic, Assyrian, Croatian, Dari, English, Greek, Gujarati, Italian, Khmer, KurdishMacedonian, Nuer, Persian, Russian, Simplified Chinese, Serbian, Somali, Traditional Chinese, Turkish, Vietnamese.

Protect yourself from thunderstorm asthma

A poster - Protect yourself from thunderstorm asthma is available in Amharic, Arabic, Assyrian, Croatian, Dari, English, Greek, Gujarati, Italian, Khmer, KurdishMacedonian, Nuer, Persian, Russian, Simplified Chinese, Serbian, Somali, Traditional Chinese, Turkish, Vietnamese.