Our health depends on the environment we live in, so how do we stay healthy in a changing climate? 

Well, during heatwaves, plan and stay somewhere cool if you can.

Drink plenty of water, never leave anyone in the car and make sure you check in on others, especially children and the elderly.

Swimming is a great way to cool off and stay active, but everyone needs to do their bit to keep the water free of germs.

Be a healthy swimmer by showering with soap before you swim and washing your hands thoroughly after going to the toilet. 

And don’t swim for 14 days after you’ve had diarrhoea.

Bacteria like Salmonella thrive in the heat, so take care when preparing, storing and serving food, especially during the warmer summer months.

Increased heavy rainfall and flooding creates ideal conditions for disease-carrying mosquitoes.

Beat the bite by covering up with loose fitting clothing and using mosquito repellent on exposed skin.

And remove any stagnant water around your home where mosquitoes can breed.

Stay healthy in our changing climate – act today for a healthier tomorrow.

 

 

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Climate change is an urgent problem that affects our health in many ways, now and in the future. So, how do we stay healthy in a changing climate?

Our health depends on the environment we live in, so how do we stay healthy in a changing climate? 

Well, during heatwaves, plan and stay somewhere cool if you can.

Drink plenty of water, never leave anyone in the car and make sure you check in on others, especially children and the elderly.

Swimming is a great way to cool off and stay active, but everyone needs to do their bit to keep the water free of germs.

Be a healthy swimmer by showering with soap before you swim and washing your hands thoroughly after going to the toilet. 

And don’t swim for 14 days after you’ve had diarrhoea.

Bacteria like Salmonella thrive in the heat, so take care when preparing, storing and serving food, especially during the warmer summer months.

Increased heavy rainfall and flooding creates ideal conditions for disease-carrying mosquitoes.

Beat the bite by covering up with loose fitting clothing and using mosquito repellent on exposed skin.

And remove any stagnant water around your home where mosquitoes can breed.

Stay healthy in our changing climate – act today for a healthier tomorrow.

 

 

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This page has been produced in consultation with and approved by: Department of Health and Human Services - RHP&R - Health Protection - Environmental Health Unit

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