Most people think of climate change as just an environmental issue.

But the World Health Organization has declared it the biggest threat to health in the 21st century.

Climate change is an urgent problem that affects our health in many ways, now and in the future. 

Already, we have seen a rise in extreme events like heat waves, floods and bushfires.

These events affect our health, threaten our food and drinking water supplies, and pollute the air we breathe. 

All of these issues affect our physical and mental health.

But it’s not all doom and gloom. 

There are simple things we can all do to protect ourselves and our loved ones from the impacts of climate change.

And the best part is, they help us to stay healthy and save money at the same time!

For example, things like walking or cycling instead of driving; eating a diet full of fruit, veggies and whole grains; reducing the amount of processed and packaged foods you eat; and choosing tap water over bottled water and sugary drinks, not only help to reduce your impact on the environment, but also improve your mental and physical wellbeing.

It’s also important to look out for those who are most at risk to the immediate impacts of climate change, like the elderly, children, pregnant women and people with chronic diseases.

To adapt to our changing climate, and make sure we’re reducing the risks of further problems, we all need to work together. 

From government to industry to communities, right down to individuals. We all play a part.

 

Climate change and health — act today for a healthier tomorrow.

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Our health and wellbeing is closely linked to the environment we live in, but our climate is rapidly changing. This has consequences for our health, wellbeing and safety.

Most people think of climate change as just an environmental issue.

But the World Health Organization has declared it the biggest threat to health in the 21st century.

Climate change is an urgent problem that affects our health in many ways, now and in the future. 

Already, we have seen a rise in extreme events like heat waves, floods and bushfires.

These events affect our health, threaten our food and drinking water supplies, and pollute the air we breathe. 

All of these issues affect our physical and mental health.

But it’s not all doom and gloom. 

There are simple things we can all do to protect ourselves and our loved ones from the impacts of climate change.

And the best part is, they help us to stay healthy and save money at the same time!

For example, things like walking or cycling instead of driving; eating a diet full of fruit, veggies and whole grains; reducing the amount of processed and packaged foods you eat; and choosing tap water over bottled water and sugary drinks, not only help to reduce your impact on the environment, but also improve your mental and physical wellbeing.

It’s also important to look out for those who are most at risk to the immediate impacts of climate change, like the elderly, children, pregnant women and people with chronic diseases.

To adapt to our changing climate, and make sure we’re reducing the risks of further problems, we all need to work together. 

From government to industry to communities, right down to individuals. We all play a part.

 

Climate change and health — act today for a healthier tomorrow.

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This page has been produced in consultation with and approved by: Department of Health and Human Services - RHP&R - Health Protection - Environmental Health Unit

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