"The first thing to say about if anyone has got a problem with drug and alcohol is that they should feel comfortable to talk to their doctor about that because if we don't know, we can't help. There's nothing to be ashamed of and people will listen to you and support you in a way that you're comfortable with."  

"They will focus on the goals from your perspective and it can be supportive in a way that appeal to your resources and really gives you an extra person to just work things out with and just explore what's going on for you. Any type of person can have a drug and alcohol issue. It could be an older person that's living alone that's in fact depressed and actually drinking excessively. It could be a high functioning executive, or a lawyer, or someone having drug problems." 

"Some people need a lot of support, a lot of care.  Some people need residential programs to go to to have time out. Other people are able to do, undertake that withdrawal, do that detox at home with the support of family and loved ones. There are also services we provide  where people can be supported in their own homes."  

"My best advice would be to accept and own the problem, and realise that you need to get help, but also that there's plenty of help out there.  Starting at your local doctor's, is a good starting place.  Otherwise, the community health centres I would recommend, and certainly perhaps investigating online for any relevant services and information as to where you might go for assistance would be the way to go I would think. The earlier you can make a step towards accessing help, the better it will be and the more chance you've got  of making a quicker recovery.  

For assistance contact DirectLine on 1800-888-236.  

For more information visit:  betterhealth.vic.gov.au/alcoholanddrug

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Victoria’s alcohol and drug treatment services provide access to a range of treatment options.

Victoria has a highly specialised, diverse, and world renowned alcohol and drug treatment sector.  

There are over 100 alcohol  and other drug treatment service providers, including non-government organisations, community health services, and hospitals across metropolitan, regional, and rural Victoria.  

Victoria's alcohol and drug treatment services provide access to a range of different treatment options, including counselling, withdrawal, residential rehabilitation, day programs, outreach, support groups, online and self-directed help, and a range of community-based services, including opioid replacement therapy.  

There is also a range of services specifically designed to meet cultural and age specific needs. 

"About 40,000 Victorians per year access our drug and alcohol treatment support system. The best way to find out about the system is to call a service called DirectLine, or get in touch through the internet. The other way to access the system is to go through your GP, or other health services that you might be involved with and they can make a referral and hook you up to the right source of support and assistance.

"The first thing to say about if anyone has got a problem with drug and alcohol is that they should feel comfortable to talk to their doctor about that because if we don't know, we can't help. There's nothing to be ashamed of and people will listen to you and support you in a way that you're comfortable with."  

"They will focus on the goals from your perspective and it can be supportive in a way that appeal to your resources and really gives you an extra person to just work things out with and just explore what's going on for you. Any type of person can have a drug and alcohol issue. It could be an older person that's living alone that's in fact depressed and actually drinking excessively. It could be a high functioning executive, or a lawyer, or someone having drug problems." 

"Some people need a lot of support, a lot of care.  Some people need residential programs to go to to have time out. Other people are able to do, undertake that withdrawal, do that detox at home with the support of family and loved ones. There are also services we provide  where people can be supported in their own homes."  

"My best advice would be to accept and own the problem, and realise that you need to get help, but also that there's plenty of help out there.  Starting at your local doctor's, is a good starting place.  Otherwise, the community health centres I would recommend, and certainly perhaps investigating online for any relevant services and information as to where you might go for assistance would be the way to go I would think. The earlier you can make a step towards accessing help, the better it will be and the more chance you've got  of making a quicker recovery.  

For assistance contact DirectLine on 1800-888-236.  

For more information visit:  betterhealth.vic.gov.au/alcoholanddrug

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Content on this website is provided for education and information purposes only. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not imply endorsement and is not intended to replace advice from your doctor or other registered health professional. Content has been prepared for Victorian residents and wider Australian audiences, and was accurate at the time of publication. Readers should note that, over time, currency and completeness of the information may change. All users are urged to always seek advice from a registered health care professional for diagnosis and answers to their medical questions.