Summary

  • Buy food in bulk to save money.
  • Shop at fresh food markets where prices are lower near closing time.
  • Buy fruit and vegetables that are in season (these are cheaper).

It is easy to eat a healthy diet on a budget. You can buy more food if you spend most of your money on basic healthy foods like bread, cereals, fruit and vegies. This way you can feed more people and keep both your wallet and your body healthy.


Comparing value for money


Some foods are better value for money than others. Compare the two photos below.

The food in Photo A is healthier and it would feed more people. The basket contains fresh fruit and vegetables, dairy products and breads and cereals. The food in Photo B is not good value for money because it would not feed as many people.


Photo A
Photo B

How to spend your shopping money


Spend your money according to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Guide to Healthy Eating.

For example, if you have $50 for food, spend:
  • $30 on eat most foods
  • $15 on eat some foods
  • $5 on sometimes foods.
Other ways to save money when buying food includes:
  • Buying food in bulk
  • Make a shopping list and sticking to it
  • Not shopping when you are hungry
  • Shopping at fresh food markets – prices are often lower near closing time
  • Buying generic or ‘no name’ brands
  • Buying fruit and vegies in season – these are cheaper and tastier
  • Buying fruit instead of packaged or high-fat, sugary snacks
  • Limiting takeaway foods
  • Not buying drinks – stick to tap water, it’s free.

Where to get help

  • Your doctor
  • Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet Tel (08) 9370 633
  • Dietitians Association of Australia Tel. 1800 812 942

Things to remember

  • You can buy more food if you spend most of your money on basic healthy foods like bread, cereals, fruit and vegies.
  • Buy food in bulk to save money.
  • Shop at fresh food markets where prices are lower near closing time.
  • Buy fruit and vegetables that are in season (these are cheaper).
References
  • Tucker talk tips – tucker for your ticker, 2010, Tucker talk tips: healthy eating and physical activity tip sheets, Victorian Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation. More information here.
  • Koolin Balit: strategic directions, Strategic directions for Aboriginal health 2012–2022, 2012, Department of Health & Human Services, Victoria. More information here.
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander guide to healthy eating, 2015, Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet. More information here.

More information

Healthy eating

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Healthy eating basics

Food types

Health conditions and food

Food science and technology

Planning shopping and cooking

Food safety and storage

Dieting and diets

Nutritional needs throughout life

Content Partner

This page has been produced in consultation with and approved by: Department of Health and Human Services - Aboriginal health

Last updated: April 2015

Page content currently being reviewed.

Content on this website is provided for education and information purposes only. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not imply endorsement and is not intended to replace advice from your doctor or other registered health professional. Content has been prepared for Victorian residents and wider Australian audiences, and was accurate at the time of publication. Readers should note that, over time, currency and completeness of the information may change. All users are urged to always seek advice from a registered health care professional for diagnosis and answers to their medical questions.