Salads are a great way for you achieve your 5 serves of vegies every day. Victoria State Public Health Nutritionist Veronica Graham gives us a great recipe idea for making some seriously tasty salads from leftover roast vegetables.
With summer here everyone looks forward to the summer fruits but don't forget about vegetables – they are just as important and so delicious.

Things that are particularly good in summer are tomato, zucchini, asparagus and your salad greens.

When you're hungry and you're thinking about a snack, think about snacking on some capsicum, snow peas, carrots. Especially as we're get into the Christmas snacks, it's really good to be Christmas parties – it's really good to have those sort of snacks in your daily diet to counteract what you might be having at the various Christmas parties that you'll be going to.

Another really good tip for summer (and it's a good tip for life) is to have one big nude salad every day – and that means a salad without dressing.

One way to make it interesting and not just the boring old lettuce leaves, is when you cook the night before, cook some extra vegetables. It doesn't matter what they are – zucchini, roast pumpkin, roast potato, sweet potato.

Save them for your lunch the next day and make it the basis of your salad – then you start adding the greens. Add lots and lots of that in and turn your leftover vegetables from the night before into this great big interesting vegetable mix.

Now that won't be enough for a meal, but if you want to turn that into a meal then you throw on some extra things – some nuts, tofu, boiled egg, leftover chicken. That turns an ordinary salad into a meal.

For a complete round off, throw in a bread roll and you're done – you've got a great healthy meal.

If you take that sort of thing through summer, you're going to feel better, you're going to feel good about yourself and you're going to be getting those 5 serves of vegetables in every day.

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Last updated: October 2015

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