Summary

  • To protect yourself from mosquito bites at home it is best top prevent mosquitoes getting into your house.
  • Maintain fly screens on windows, doors, vents and chimneys.
  • Use insect sprays and repellents containing either picaridin or DEET,  both inside and outside the house to kill mosquitoes.
  • Remove stagnant water around the house so mosquitoes can not breed.
  • Change pet drinking bowls, bird baths and vase waters at least once a week.
  • Check and maintain rainwater tanks and water storage vessels

Mosquitoes are not just annoying – some mosquitoes can carry serious diseases. Remember, it’s best to try to prevent mosquitoes getting into your home in the first place!

Follow this simple checklist to stop mosquitoes breeding on your property and from getting inside your home. 

Maintain fly screens to keep mosquitoes out of your home

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Maintain fly screens on windows, doors, vents and chimneys.
Screens should be no coarser than 12 x 12 meshes per 25mm, or 1.2mm. Use an even coarser mesh if you wish to keep out other smaller biting insects, like sandflies.

Use insect sprays and repellents around the home

Insect sprays and repellents can be used both inside and outside the house to kill mosquitoes.  It is important to use these products according to directions on the bottle.

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Use ‘knockdown’ fly spray against visible mosquitoes in your home.

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Use plug-in mosquito “zappers” or vaporisers in enclosed verandahs. These should be switched off as soon as the area is no longer in use. Consider using insect repellent at the same time.

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Use mosquito-coils in outdoor areas. These should be supervised at all times. Consider using insect repellent at the same time.

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Target areas like spraying the shaded shrubbery near your home. Avoid spraying these products near fish ponds.  Remember to read instructions about safe use of any insect sprays.

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If mosquitoes are particularly bad, consider using a long-acting surface spray in areas where mosquitoes like to rest.

Limited mosquitoes from breeding in your yard and garden

You are first in line to be bitten by mosquitoes that breed in your own yard and garden! Mosquitoes can breed even in the tiniest amounts of water. Remove stagnant water so mosquitoes can’t breed

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Clean up your yard and remove anything where water can collect, such as unused pots and tyres.

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Cover or overturn trailers, wheelbarrows, boats, tools and children’s playground toys to avoid water collection.

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Regularly clean gutters and drains so water runs freely.

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Mend leaking taps.

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Change pet drinking bowls, bird baths and vase waters at least once a week, and more regularly in very warm weather.

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Put sand around the base of pot plants.

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Keep swimming pools well maintained or empty or securely covered if not in use.

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Keep fish ponds tidy with minimal vegetation around the edges.

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Keep lawns and gardens trimmed back to reduce the areas where mosquitoes rest.

Check and maintain rainwater tanks and water storage vessels

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Water tanks must be completely sealed. Check lids, covers and inlet pipes for any gaps.

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Fit removable screen mesh to the outlet end of overflow pipes and to all inlets.

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Make sure any water collection containers have secure lids or screens.

Where to get help

If you have any concerns about your health

  • Your doctor
  • NURSE-ON-CALL Tel. 1300 60 60 24 – for expert health information and advice (24 hours, 7 days)
  • Your pharmacist
References

Beat the bite! Mosquito-proof your home, Department of Health and Human Services, Victoria Australia, October 2016

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This page has been produced in consultation with and approved by: Department of Health and Human Services

Last updated: July 2017

Content on this website is provided for education and information purposes only. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not imply endorsement and is not intended to replace advice from your doctor or other registered health professional. Content has been prepared for Victorian residents and wider Australian audiences, and was accurate at the time of publication. Readers should note that, over time, currency and completeness of the information may change. All users are urged to always seek advice from a registered health care professional for diagnosis and answers to their medical questions.