It may sound like a cliché, but you're never too old to get started. Even if you are a senior citizen, you can reap many rewards from an exercise program. Strength training is great for muscle tone, retaining bone density and increasing joint flexibility. Take 81-year-old Smaida Lobell. What an inspiration.

Smaida: I can jump out of bed in the morning. I have no pains or aches anywhere and I can walk my dog, three times around the football field.

Alan (YMCA operator): It's just fabulous, the amount of people that are sort of coming through and the benefits that we're getting, and every day you'll hear something - - somebody will say I can I can lift the ladder better or I can now pick up the grandkids better or pick up the dog or. You know, everything is easier. Life is easier, and just the friends they're making here.

On screen: Excuse - I hate exercising.

Sue: You probably think you hate it, because you've been stuck doing activities you just don't enjoy. Try doing things you really like, or do something you've never tried.

Alan: Just get out there and do it. My word, it won't happen just thinking about it. You've actually got to get out there and do it. It won't do it by itself.

Sue: Exercising is a great way to meet new people, and who knows, you may even enjoy it." />
Former world aerobics champion, Sue Stanley shows us how to overcome common exercise excuses. Whether you are a parent, older person, on a low budget or have a health condition, there are many ways to keep active and healthy. Join media personality, Geoff Cox (Coxy) as he finds out how to change his attitude to physical activity.
Sue: Excuses, excuses, excuses. Everyone's got one when it comes to exercising. Just ask someone we know and love.

Coxy: Too hot, too cold, sore shoulder, dark, don't like night time. Too early. Good movie on the telly. Too ah, got to feed the dog.

Sue: Yep, that just about sums it up, Coxy. More from my moustachioed mate later but first, let's dismantle excuse number one.

On screen: Excuse - Looking after the kids takes up all my time.

Mother: Want to go up into the park and have lunch?

Sue: Now, I know how busy mums and dads can get, and it's tough when you're not getting much sleep.

Mother: I don't find time for my exercise.

Sue: Well, I can actually show you some exercise you can do while you're in your house and you can do it with your kids. The beauty of exercising at home, you can use the equipment you already have like a simple bench, by doing some step ups and down. By stepping up. Excellent. And while we're here, great for the triceps and the back of the arms. Sitting up. Excellent. But if you do want to escape the house, pushing a pram gives you a great cardio workout and keeps the kids entertained. It's also a nice way to meet some new friends.

On screen: Excuse - It’s too hot or too cold

Sue: Now, this would be one of the weakest excuses because there's plenty of ways to exercise around the weather. Isn't there, guys?

People in gym: Yes.

Sue: Exercising is a great way to beat the winter blues, and in summer, a swim is the best way to cool off.

On Screen: Excuse - It’s too expensive to join a gym

Sue: Gym memberships are very affordable nowadays, because of increased competition. It can work out to be less than a dollar a day. Now, if you don't like going to the gym, try out some home fitness equipment. A resistance band and an exercise ball allow you to work every muscle group.

On screen: Excuse - I’m too unfit

Sue: Oh, please, we heard all of Coxy's excuses earlier, but it's never too late to turn your attitude around.

Coxy: Once I'm out here I love it, it's just, getting out. Like this morning, I got up. My wife got up and she said come on, let's go for a run, bit of a walk and a run. And I looked out the window and it's not like this, it was freezing, and I said, oh look, I don’t have to be at work at 10. I'll do it a bit later. And no, and she just smiled. She knew I wasn't going to get there.

Sue: Oh, that's enough stretch, and exercising your shoulders.

Coxy: Shoulders, yeah.

Sue: Arthritis, osteoporosis, heart problems, diabetes. Sorry, none of these health problems are reasons to be inactive.

Coxy: Oh, been a while since they've been stretched, my dear.

Sue: Do you feel that?

Coxy: Yeah, certainly can.

Sue: That's enough warming up. Let’s go for our walk.

Coxy: As well?

Sue: Yes. In fact, being active will help you manage these conditions. You just need to check with your doctor first.

On screen: Excuse - I’m too old to get started

Sue: It may sound like a cliché, but you're never too old to get started. Even if you are a senior citizen, you can reap many rewards from an exercise program. Strength training is great for muscle tone, retaining bone density and increasing joint flexibility. Take 81-year-old Smaida Lobell. What an inspiration.

Smaida: I can jump out of bed in the morning. I have no pains or aches anywhere and I can walk my dog, three times around the football field.

Alan (YMCA operator): It's just fabulous, the amount of people that are sort of coming through and the benefits that we're getting, and every day you'll hear something - - somebody will say I can I can lift the ladder better or I can now pick up the grandkids better or pick up the dog or. You know, everything is easier. Life is easier, and just the friends they're making here.

On screen: Excuse - I hate exercising.

Sue: You probably think you hate it, because you've been stuck doing activities you just don't enjoy. Try doing things you really like, or do something you've never tried.

Alan: Just get out there and do it. My word, it won't happen just thinking about it. You've actually got to get out there and do it. It won't do it by itself.

Sue: Exercising is a great way to meet new people, and who knows, you may even enjoy it.

Content Partner

This page has been produced in consultation with and approved by: Department of Health and Human Services

Last updated: October 2015

Content on this website is provided for information purposes only. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not in any way endorse or support such therapy, service, product or treatment and is not intended to replace advice from your doctor or other registered health professional. The information and materials contained on this website are not intended to constitute a comprehensive guide concerning all aspects of the therapy, product or treatment described on the website. All users are urged to always seek advice from a registered health care professional for diagnosis and answers to their medical questions and to ascertain whether the particular therapy, service, product or treatment described on the website is suitable in their circumstances. The State of Victoria and the Department of Health & Human Services shall not bear any liability for reliance by any user on the materials contained on this website.