Lifeline on 13 11 14 or beyondblue on 1300 224 636. In an emergency, call 000.

IMAGES: A man, Darce Manihera, is shown leaning against a tree trunk covered in craggy, grey bark. Darce is scratching his neck and chin, hand in pocket, staring into the distance. Darce is wearing a khaki knit hoodie, jeans, sneakers and a smart watch. His sleeves are pushed up to reveal a tribal tattoo.

“The first time I actually even heard the words Borderline Personality Disorder, I was 22 years old, and I was in a psychiatric ward. 

“One minute you could be really, really happy and then the next minute you could just feel like your whole world is over.” 

IMAGES: Darce is shown doing the dishes before looking out the kitchen window, staring into the distance. Cuts to Darce talking to the camera while sitting in an open-plan kitchen/dining area. There is a white Buddha head statue in the foreground.

“Something that seemed so simple could really affect me where I can just get really upset. Sometimes I even feel like ending my life.”

IMAGES: Darce is outside in the garden. It’s a cloudy day. Checking surroundings. Looking pensive. Stares into the camera, looks at peace. Cuts back to sitting in the dining area.

“I would also feel you know when relationships would break down or friendships would break down that I was alone and that it just wasn’t worth living. 

“I didn’t really know how to feel certain emotions so I thought I was going to be really short lived . I myself just thought that I was not going to live until I saw 30.

“My name is Darce Manihera and I live in Glenroy, Victoria.”

IMAGES: Darce is seated and shown talking to someone just outside camera. Cuts to the garden where Darce is standing in front of a flowering bush. Returns to talking in the dining area.

“When I had Borderline Personality Disorder, I thought I was a lot crazier than what I already was but once I started getting more information about BPD and just listening to other peoples’ stories with BPD that’s where it kinda made a bit more sense to me that I can live a happy and fulfilled life.

“For me it was just about seeking the right help for the right diagnosis that I had, and just finding a connection with someone who would be able to help me get through.

“When I started seeing my psychiatrist, I had this huge release of just not being judged and not feeling that I had to lie to anyone about what was really going on inside my head.”

IMAGES: A decorative wooden board is shown, it’s white and has instructional life messages written on it – advice such as ‘Love One Another’, ‘Say Please & Thank You’, ‘Give Hugs and Kisses’, and ‘Eat Your Greens’. Darce is shown sorting through old photographs at a desk. Darce smiles when he picks up a photograph of himself as a school-aged child.

“My first advice would be to just keep going. I know that it feels hard and that you feel all alone.”

IMAGES: Darce is shown sitting on a sofa, holding hands with his partner who is petting a dog on her lap. They are talking and laughing, and playing with the dog, a whippet. The couple are shown from behind, holding hands and walking down the street. 

"But my life now, I see a lot of brightness and a lot of, I say, light in my life. I feel I’m genuinely happy on the inside and it’s not just a mask that I wear.

“I’m now surrounding myself with people who are more supportive, loving and caring, and there’s always someone out there that loves you and wants to hear from you. Because the true and honest people that want to be in your life, they will be there with you through the good and the bad.”


IMAGES: The screen fades to white.  Writing appears which says ‘It’s Time to Talk about Mental Health’. The next screen says for support contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or beyondblue; The final screen says To find out more search www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au. Better Health Channel #timetotalkvic

" />

Darce Manihera was challenged by mental illness for years, spending time homeless and in acute care. 

While being diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder was challenging, Darce was linked with Melbourne-based organisation Spectrum which has helped him change his life. 

The café worker now encourages everyone who needs support to keep trying until they find the support that works for them. 

If you or someone you know needs support, call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or beyondblue on 1300 224 636. In an emergency, call 000.

 

If you or someone you know needs support, call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or beyondblue on 1300 224 636. In an emergency, call 000.

IMAGES: A man, Darce Manihera, is shown leaning against a tree trunk covered in craggy, grey bark. Darce is scratching his neck and chin, hand in pocket, staring into the distance. Darce is wearing a khaki knit hoodie, jeans, sneakers and a smart watch. His sleeves are pushed up to reveal a tribal tattoo.

“The first time I actually even heard the words Borderline Personality Disorder, I was 22 years old, and I was in a psychiatric ward. 

“One minute you could be really, really happy and then the next minute you could just feel like your whole world is over.” 

IMAGES: Darce is shown doing the dishes before looking out the kitchen window, staring into the distance. Cuts to Darce talking to the camera while sitting in an open-plan kitchen/dining area. There is a white Buddha head statue in the foreground.

“Something that seemed so simple could really affect me where I can just get really upset. Sometimes I even feel like ending my life.”

IMAGES: Darce is outside in the garden. It’s a cloudy day. Checking surroundings. Looking pensive. Stares into the camera, looks at peace. Cuts back to sitting in the dining area.

“I would also feel you know when relationships would break down or friendships would break down that I was alone and that it just wasn’t worth living. 

“I didn’t really know how to feel certain emotions so I thought I was going to be really short lived . I myself just thought that I was not going to live until I saw 30.

“My name is Darce Manihera and I live in Glenroy, Victoria.”

IMAGES: Darce is seated and shown talking to someone just outside camera. Cuts to the garden where Darce is standing in front of a flowering bush. Returns to talking in the dining area.

“When I had Borderline Personality Disorder, I thought I was a lot crazier than what I already was but once I started getting more information about BPD and just listening to other peoples’ stories with BPD that’s where it kinda made a bit more sense to me that I can live a happy and fulfilled life.

“For me it was just about seeking the right help for the right diagnosis that I had, and just finding a connection with someone who would be able to help me get through.

“When I started seeing my psychiatrist, I had this huge release of just not being judged and not feeling that I had to lie to anyone about what was really going on inside my head.”

IMAGES: A decorative wooden board is shown, it’s white and has instructional life messages written on it – advice such as ‘Love One Another’, ‘Say Please & Thank You’, ‘Give Hugs and Kisses’, and ‘Eat Your Greens’. Darce is shown sorting through old photographs at a desk. Darce smiles when he picks up a photograph of himself as a school-aged child.

“My first advice would be to just keep going. I know that it feels hard and that you feel all alone.”

IMAGES: Darce is shown sitting on a sofa, holding hands with his partner who is petting a dog on her lap. They are talking and laughing, and playing with the dog, a whippet. The couple are shown from behind, holding hands and walking down the street. 

"But my life now, I see a lot of brightness and a lot of, I say, light in my life. I feel I’m genuinely happy on the inside and it’s not just a mask that I wear.

“I’m now surrounding myself with people who are more supportive, loving and caring, and there’s always someone out there that loves you and wants to hear from you. Because the true and honest people that want to be in your life, they will be there with you through the good and the bad.”


IMAGES: The screen fades to white.  Writing appears which says ‘It’s Time to Talk about Mental Health’. The next screen says for support contact Lifeline on 13 11 14 or beyondblue; The final screen says To find out more search www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au. Better Health Channel #timetotalkvic

Content Partner

This page has been produced in consultation with and approved by:

Last updated:

Content on this website is provided for information purposes only. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not in any way endorse or support such therapy, service, product or treatment and is not intended to replace advice from your doctor or other registered health professional. The information and materials contained on this website are not intended to constitute a comprehensive guide concerning all aspects of the therapy, product or treatment described on the website. All users are urged to always seek advice from a registered health care professional for diagnosis and answers to their medical questions and to ascertain whether the particular therapy, service, product or treatment described on the website is suitable in their circumstances. The State of Victoria and the Department of Health & Human Services shall not bear any liability for reliance by any user on the materials contained on this website.