Summary

  • No matter who you are, you can be affected by family violence (also called domestic violence)
  • Within Australia, intimate partner violence is the most common form of family violence. 
  • Evidence presented to the Royal Commission into Family Violence suggests intimate partner violence is as prevalent in LGBTIQ communities as it is in the general population.
  • Studies have shown that approximately one-third of LGBTIQ people in Victoria (and nationally) have experienced intimate partner abuse, but that only 20 per cent of these cases are reported.
  • If you are affected by family violence, help and support are available. You are not alone.

No matter who you are, you can be affected by family violence (also called domestic violence).

Within Australia, intimate partner violence is the most common form of family violence. 

Evidence presented to the Royal Commission into Family Violence suggests intimate partner violence is as prevalent in LGBTIQ communities as it is in the general population.

Studies have shown that approximately one-third of LGBTIQ people in Victoria (and nationally) have experienced intimate partner abuse, but that only 20 per cent of these cases are reported.

If you are affected by family violence, help and support are available. You are not alone.

LGBTIQ people may face specific types of family violence

Members of the LGBTIQ communities often experience the same types of family violence as people who do not identify as LGBTIQ. They also experience LGBTIQ-specific forms of family violence that focus more on a person’s sexuality, gender identity or expression, or intersex status. Some examples of this type of family violence include:

  • threatening to ‘out’ a person or disclose their HIV status
  • isolating a person from the wider LGBTIQ communities
  • ridiculing a person’s gender expression or intersex traits
  • preventing a person from accessing gender affirming hormones or treatments for HIV or other chronic illnesses
  • telling a person no one will help them because the support services are homophobic
  • telling a person they ‘deserve’ the abuse because of their sexuality
  • telling a person they’re not a ‘real’ homosexual because of their former partners, or their friendships and preferences
  • portraying the violence as mutual or consensual combat (hiding the abuse behind stereotypes)
  • portraying the violence as an expression of ‘masculinity’
  • pressuring, forcing or tricking a person into having unsafe sex 
  • involving a person in bondage and discipline or sadomasochism (BDSM) without consent 
  • making a person have sex with other people
  • threatening to infect a partner with a chronic illness, such as HIV. 

LGBTIQ people may feel shut out from services and support 

LGBTIQ people face particular barriers to obtaining services and support for family violence Some examples are:

  • self-blame: sometimes an LGBTIQ person will believe they were abused because of their sexual identity and blame themselves for others’ behaviour
  • fear of discrimination: some people within the LGBTIQ communities may fear seeking help because of the possibility of homophobia, transphobia and other discrimination. They may also be concerned about their privacy and confidentiality in small or rural communities
  • lack of information and support: the police and courts system and some mainstream service providers may not be as aware of family violence experiences for LGBTIQ people as they are for other communities. This may make LGBTIQ people feel unseen and unheard
  • under-reporting of family violence: some people may be too afraid to report their abuse to police or fear being outed if they report the abuse, and so the crimes are not being recognised within LGBTIQ communities. 

The lack of knowledge about family violence in LGBTIQ communities can cause other problems for the victim of abuse too. For example, they: 

  • may incorrectly believe family violence doesn’t happen in LGBTIQ relationships
  • may not recognise their experiences of abuse as family violence 
  • may not know how to respond if they see family violence among their friends and family. 

All of the issues and barriers facing LGBTIQ people can be even worse for people who are LGBTIQ and Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander or from a culturally and linguistically diverse background.

Despite these challenges, it is important to report family violence and to get help and support. See the ‘Where to get help’ section below for information on specific services for LGBTIQ communities, and mainstream services.

The Queer without fear booklet is a useful resource for LGBTIQ people experiencing family violence, and their family and friends. 

Remember…

  • Family violence can happen regardless of your gender and sexual identity or your cultural background, ability, religion, wealth, status or location.
  • Intimate partner violence may be just as prevalent within the LGBTIQ communities as it is in the general population.
  • For LGBTIQ people, family violence may focus more on a person’s sexuality, gender identity or expression, or intersex status.
  • Despite the barriers and issues facing people in the LGBTIQ communities, it is important to report family violence and to get help and support.

Where to get help

 
References

More information

Relationships

The following content is displayed as Tabs. Once you have activated a link navigate to the end of the list to view its associated content. The activated link is defined as Active Tab

Developing relationships

Relationship difficulties

Violence and abuse

Getting help

Content Partner

This page has been produced in consultation with and approved by: Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria ? DVRCV

Last updated: October 2017

Content on this website is provided for information purposes only. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not in any way endorse or support such therapy, service, product or treatment and is not intended to replace advice from your doctor or other registered health professional. The information and materials contained on this website are not intended to constitute a comprehensive guide concerning all aspects of the therapy, product or treatment described on the website. All users are urged to always seek advice from a registered health care professional for diagnosis and answers to their medical questions and to ascertain whether the particular therapy, service, product or treatment described on the website is suitable in their circumstances. The State of Victoria and the Department of Health & Human Services shall not bear any liability for reliance by any user on the materials contained on this website.