Annie: If you can get an understanding on what's going on with your condition then you become more confident, and you become more able to manage your own condition. It can be fearful, there's an awful lot of information to absorb, and it just takes time. You just have to give it time.

Kath & Eddie: It's frightening at first, I must admit. Because you think about it, and you wonder, and then you suddenly think, well there's not much good in me sitting here feeling sorry for myself; I've got to do something. And that's what you do. Exercise, move yourself around, do what you can, try not to think about it unless you're in pain. Well then you do something about it. And be on good terms with your doctors, you must do that, and ask questions when you don't really know.

Alan & Margaret: Make sure you have a good doctor who's interested in you, and if you have any questions ask him, don't let him tell you. If you're not completely happy with what he's suggesting, you put your question to him, that what you would really like done, if he doesn't agree with that well, go and find another doctor.

Alan & Margaret: Second opinion.

Iona: Don't give up the things that you've been doing, that's both mentally and physically, because once you sit down and fold your hands and say poor me, that's the beginning of future problems.

Graham: There'd be a lot more women at any meetings you go to than men, but it's certainly worthwhile. Because you can learn a lot about it. You can talk to other people who've got osteoporosis, and discuss what they do, in the way of diet, and even medication if you choose to. So I'd be encouraging men to particularly find out about as much as they can about osteoporosis.

Iona: You can't help bad days, but even on a bad day you can find something, even if it's just a walk up the corner, go across to a neighbour. Small things, and mentally that gets you going, which is doesn't help the physical side of it but it does help your attitude

Graham: My aim is that it won't progress any further, I mean I don't know how confident I can be at saying that, but I'm prepared for, hopefully many years of an active life ahead of me

Beryl: There's help out there, and you use it. It's there for your benefit, and you find it and you use it, and get on with your life and don't let it get you down.

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People with osteoporosis provide reassuring advice to others living with the same condition.

Annie: If you can get an understanding on what's going on with your condition then you become more confident, and you become more able to manage your own condition. It can be fearful, there's an awful lot of information to absorb, and it just takes time. You just have to give it time.

Kath & Eddie: It's frightening at first, I must admit. Because you think about it, and you wonder, and then you suddenly think, well there's not much good in me sitting here feeling sorry for myself; I've got to do something. And that's what you do. Exercise, move yourself around, do what you can, try not to think about it unless you're in pain. Well then you do something about it. And be on good terms with your doctors, you must do that, and ask questions when you don't really know.

Alan & Margaret: Make sure you have a good doctor who's interested in you, and if you have any questions ask him, don't let him tell you. If you're not completely happy with what he's suggesting, you put your question to him, that what you would really like done, if he doesn't agree with that well, go and find another doctor.

Alan & Margaret: Second opinion.

Iona: Don't give up the things that you've been doing, that's both mentally and physically, because once you sit down and fold your hands and say poor me, that's the beginning of future problems.

Graham: There'd be a lot more women at any meetings you go to than men, but it's certainly worthwhile. Because you can learn a lot about it. You can talk to other people who've got osteoporosis, and discuss what they do, in the way of diet, and even medication if you choose to. So I'd be encouraging men to particularly find out about as much as they can about osteoporosis.

Iona: You can't help bad days, but even on a bad day you can find something, even if it's just a walk up the corner, go across to a neighbour. Small things, and mentally that gets you going, which is doesn't help the physical side of it but it does help your attitude

Graham: My aim is that it won't progress any further, I mean I don't know how confident I can be at saying that, but I'm prepared for, hopefully many years of an active life ahead of me

Beryl: There's help out there, and you use it. It's there for your benefit, and you find it and you use it, and get on with your life and don't let it get you down.

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This page has been produced in consultation with and approved by: RealTime Health and Arthritis Victoria

Last updated: October 2015

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