Medication, know what you’re taking – Get well soon

Louise - When I went into hospital I took my medication with me, but I was surprised when I was taken off some of the tablets I had been taking for years.

Keith - The doctor said your body changes as you get older and this can change the way medicine affects you, so sometimes stopping different medications can help you feel better.

Thelma - I guess the more medications you take, the more likely you are to have a problem or get bad side effects, which makes sense really.

John - I wasn’t too sure what the medicine I was being given in hospital was for and I’d never usually think to question the doctor or nurse, but now I know it’s important to always ask questions.

Peter - I asked them to tell me when they changed my medications so I could find out how much I should be taking and when.

Elaine - I also like to know why I need to take it and what side effects there might be, so I try to remember to ask the nurse that too.

Enetta / Thelma - I couldn’t quite recall the reason some of my of my tablets were changed when I came into hospital.


Keith - There was so much information to keep track of and I didn’t really understand it all straight away, so I asked the pharmacist to write it down for me.


Elaine - She told me to always keep an up-to-date list of my medicines with me, with everything from my prescription stuff to my vitamins and over-the-counter things.


Louise - Now I know that keeping track of all my medications is really important. It’s how I can make sure everyone in my healthcare team is on the same page when it comes to taking my medication.


Tag Line (spoken by Caroline) ‘Know what you’re taking – Get well soon’

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Keeping track of all the medications you are taking is important.  Hear advice on how to manage medications while you are in  hospital.

Medication, know what you’re taking – Get well soon

Louise - When I went into hospital I took my medication with me, but I was surprised when I was taken off some of the tablets I had been taking for years.

Keith - The doctor said your body changes as you get older and this can change the way medicine affects you, so sometimes stopping different medications can help you feel better.

Thelma - I guess the more medications you take, the more likely you are to have a problem or get bad side effects, which makes sense really.

John - I wasn’t too sure what the medicine I was being given in hospital was for and I’d never usually think to question the doctor or nurse, but now I know it’s important to always ask questions.

Peter - I asked them to tell me when they changed my medications so I could find out how much I should be taking and when.

Elaine - I also like to know why I need to take it and what side effects there might be, so I try to remember to ask the nurse that too.

Enetta / Thelma - I couldn’t quite recall the reason some of my of my tablets were changed when I came into hospital.


Keith - There was so much information to keep track of and I didn’t really understand it all straight away, so I asked the pharmacist to write it down for me.


Elaine - She told me to always keep an up-to-date list of my medicines with me, with everything from my prescription stuff to my vitamins and over-the-counter things.


Louise - Now I know that keeping track of all my medications is really important. It’s how I can make sure everyone in my healthcare team is on the same page when it comes to taking my medication.


Tag Line (spoken by Caroline) ‘Know what you’re taking – Get well soon’

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This page has been produced in consultation with and approved by: DHHS and National Ageing Research Institute Ltd

Last updated: March 2016

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