With NDIS came choice and opportunity  to do the things that he wanted to do,  things like cooking classes,  not just with a disability support group,  cooking classes in the Jamie Oliver."

"I've become very positive about everything.  Some had said that my health has improved quite a, quite a large amount."

"How do people access the NDIS?  Well there is an access criteria.  So there's an age criteria,so people need to be  under the age of 65.  There's a residence criteria,  so people need to be Australian citizens  or permanent residents.  And of course there's a disability criteria.  So people have to have a permanent disability  or a disability that's likely to be permanent, and that disability must have  a significant functional impact on their daily life. "

"I'm a mother of five.  My youngest two children both have disabilities.  My daughter, Lindy, who is 22, has Downes syndrome.  And my son, Josh, who is just about  17 is on the autism spectrum.  And I also have a husband,  had a stroke, which has left him with left-side weakness  and some brain deficits.  So as, it's now become an interesting household where we have multiple disabilities."

"We work on developing a plan.  And the plan will have access to a whole range of supports  that a person needs, personal care,  any of those therapies,any of those supports that the person needs to get on and meet their goals  and aspirations, and live their ordinary life. That's what the NDIS is there to provide support for."

"And he's been able to take responsibility for some of the things that he used to do that he was prevented to do, like going to the pharmacy and getting his own medication, taking Lindy down to have a swim lesson, and things like that.  So it's been much more like a natural family."

"We know there's going to be more demand under the NDIS  so we need service providers to emerge, to diversify, to go into areas that they haven't been into before  because it's really important that NDIS participants  have access to vibrant markets that they can choose from."

"So our world's gone from a very small place  where we carried a really heavy load of responsibility, it was very lonely, it was very isolated, our world's a much, much bigger place.  He's become a teacher instead of  a child with a disability."

"We're building the capacity of people with disabilities to engage in society,  to engage in workforce, and to break down any of those stereotypes or barriers that can be done, to make sure that people with disability in this country have the same opportunity that all Australians have."

"There's so many things I'd like to say  to people who haven' tyet experienced NDIS.  It's new, it's big, it's scary because it's unknown.  It's different to how things have been done in the past,  but I truly believe it's better.  It's better for everyone.  It's about choice.  It's about options.  And don't be afraid of what you might lose.  Start to dream about what you might gain."

Contact the National Disability Insurance Scheme if you are under 65 years of age.  Contact My Aged Care if you are over 65 years of age. 

For more information, visit:  betterhealth.vic.gov.au/disability

 

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Learn about options and services available to people with a disability living in Victoria.

Across Victoria, people with a disability will receive services and support under a new national scheme. 

The National Disability Insurance Scheme or NDIS replaces a complex mix of state and commonwealth programs and provides certainty of all Australians less than 65 years of age living with a disability. 

For people over 65, the Australian government runs My Aged Care, which provides a range of services to support you once trendies commences in your area. 

Until that time, the Victorian government will continue to provide some services. 

The NDIS aims to improve services and support  to people with a disability and their careers. 

"The person is at the centre of the funded supports that they need. The person will have choice and control  over the supports, how they'll access supports, and how they'll manage those supports.  And because it's an insurance scheme, every Australian has the a surety that if they would require disability or they already have a disability,  that the NDIS is thereto give them the supports  they will need to get on with their lives." 

With NDIS came choice and opportunity  to do the things that he wanted to do,  things like cooking classes,  not just with a disability support group,  cooking classes in the Jamie Oliver."

"I've become very positive about everything.  Some had said that my health has improved quite a, quite a large amount."

"How do people access the NDIS?  Well there is an access criteria.  So there's an age criteria,so people need to be  under the age of 65.  There's a residence criteria,  so people need to be Australian citizens  or permanent residents.  And of course there's a disability criteria.  So people have to have a permanent disability  or a disability that's likely to be permanent, and that disability must have  a significant functional impact on their daily life. "

"I'm a mother of five.  My youngest two children both have disabilities.  My daughter, Lindy, who is 22, has Downes syndrome.  And my son, Josh, who is just about  17 is on the autism spectrum.  And I also have a husband,  had a stroke, which has left him with left-side weakness  and some brain deficits.  So as, it's now become an interesting household where we have multiple disabilities."

"We work on developing a plan.  And the plan will have access to a whole range of supports  that a person needs, personal care,  any of those therapies,any of those supports that the person needs to get on and meet their goals  and aspirations, and live their ordinary life. That's what the NDIS is there to provide support for."

"And he's been able to take responsibility for some of the things that he used to do that he was prevented to do, like going to the pharmacy and getting his own medication, taking Lindy down to have a swim lesson, and things like that.  So it's been much more like a natural family."

"We know there's going to be more demand under the NDIS  so we need service providers to emerge, to diversify, to go into areas that they haven't been into before  because it's really important that NDIS participants  have access to vibrant markets that they can choose from."

"So our world's gone from a very small place  where we carried a really heavy load of responsibility, it was very lonely, it was very isolated, our world's a much, much bigger place.  He's become a teacher instead of  a child with a disability."

"We're building the capacity of people with disabilities to engage in society,  to engage in workforce, and to break down any of those stereotypes or barriers that can be done, to make sure that people with disability in this country have the same opportunity that all Australians have."

"There's so many things I'd like to say  to people who haven' tyet experienced NDIS.  It's new, it's big, it's scary because it's unknown.  It's different to how things have been done in the past,  but I truly believe it's better.  It's better for everyone.  It's about choice.  It's about options.  And don't be afraid of what you might lose.  Start to dream about what you might gain."

Contact the National Disability Insurance Scheme if you are under 65 years of age.  Contact My Aged Care if you are over 65 years of age. 

For more information, visit:  betterhealth.vic.gov.au/disability

 

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