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Grief - how to support the bereaved

Summary

Support for a grieving relative, friend or colleague is helpful, but can be hard. You can do many things to help someone who is grieving for a loved one. Make personal contact and attend the funeral or memorial service if you can. Practical help with things like housework, meals or shopping can help. If you don't know how to support someone who is grieving, ask them how you can help.

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Sometimes it's hard to know how to offer support to a grieving relative, friend or colleague. We may be afraid of saying the wrong thing, so we say nothing at all, which can leave the bereaved person feeling isolated.

If we haven't experienced the death of a loved one, we may have unrealistic expectations of how the grieving person should feel, or how quickly they should return to the activities of daily living or get on with their life.

There are many things you can do or say to help, but remember that everyone's experience of grief is different. Some of your thoughts and suggestions may be appropriate and others may not be. If you're unsure of how to support someone who is grieving, ask them to tell you what they need or want. Just letting them know that you care and wish to help can be comforting.

How to help a bereaved person in the first few days


Suggestions include:
  • Contact the bereaved person as soon as possible after their loved one's death. This contact could be a personal visit, telephone call, sympathy card or flowers.
  • Attend the funeral, if you can. They need to know that you care enough to support them through this difficult event.
  • Offer your support and ask them how they would like you to support them.
  • Listen to them if they want to open up to you and try to suspend all judgement.

Listen with compassion to a bereaved person


The most important help you can offer is a willing ear. Allow the bereaved person to talk and express their grief in whatever way they need. This may include crying, angry outbursts, screaming, laughing, expressions of guilt or regret, or engaging in activities that reduce their stress, such as walking or gardening.

Suggestions include:
  • Concentrate your efforts on listening carefully and with compassion.
  • Everyone's experience of grief is unique, so let them grieve their own way. Don't judge or dispute their responses to the death of their loved one. Criticising the way they express their grief is hurtful and may make them less likely to share their thoughts and feelings with you.
  • If they don't feel like talking, don't push them. Remember that you are comforting them just by being there and sitting together in silence is helpful too.
  • Don't forget the power of human touch. Holding the person's hand or giving them a hug communicates emotional support.

Approaches to avoid with a bereaved person


Accept that there is nothing you can say to make them feel better about their loss.

Approaches to avoid include:
  • Telling them about your grief experience instead of listening to them
  • Comparing their grief with yours or anyone else's
  • Describing the 'stages of grief' and suggesting they're not moving through the stages quickly enough
  • Telling them they're grieving in the 'wrong' way
  • Giving them unsolicited advice about how they can best get over their grief
  • Reasoning with them about how they should or shouldn't feel.

Comments to avoid


It is a natural reaction to want to ease the person's pain. However, well-meaning words that encourage the bereaved to 'look on the bright side' can be hurtful.

The type of comments that should be avoided include:
  • 'You'll get married again one day.'
  • 'At least you have your other children.'
  • 'She's lucky she lived to such a ripe old age.'
  • 'It was God's will.'
  • 'You can always try for another baby.'
  • 'He's happy in heaven.'
  • 'Be thankful they're not in pain anymore.'
  • 'Try to remember the good times.'
  • 'You'll feel better soon.'
  • 'Time heals all wounds.'
  • 'Count your blessings, you still have a lot to be grateful for.'
  • 'You've got to pull yourself together and be strong.'
  • 'I know exactly how you feel.'

Grief is a process


Grief is a process and not an event. Coming to terms with the death of a loved one can take months and years, rather than days and weeks. Suggestions include:
  • Don't shy away from the bereaved person after the funeral. Keep in contact, even just by phone.
  • Never suggest that it's time they 'got over it' and moved on with life. Appreciate that the person may continue to grieve in subtle ways for the rest of their life.
  • Don't change the subject if the deceased naturally comes up in conversation. The bereaved person needs to know that their loved one hasn't been forgotten. Use the name of the deceased in conversation. Avoid using words like he or she.
  • Remember, there will be days in the year that will be particularly difficult for the person to bear, such as anniversaries, Christmas, Easter and the deceased's birthday. Be sensitive to these times and offer your support.

Practical help for a grieving person


You can show the grieving person that you care by offering practical help. Suggestions include:
  • Do some of their housework, such as cleaning or clothes washing.
  • Answer the telephone for them.
  • Bring over pre-cooked meals that only need to be reheated before serving.
  • Take over some of their regular duties, such as picking up the children from school.
  • Be mindful that they may not want you to support them in this way and their requests should be respected.
If your friend is showing signs of depression or expressing suicidal thoughts, consider taking them to the nearest hospital.

Where to get help

  • Your doctor
  • A trained bereavement counsellor
  • NURSE-ON-CALL Tel. 1300 60 60 24 – for expert health information and advice (24 hours, 7 days)
  • Australian Centre for Grief and Bereavement – Bereavement Information and Referral Service Tel. 1300 664 786
  • SuicideLine Victoria Tel. 1300 651 251 – for counselling, crisis intervention, information and referral (24 hours, 7 days)
  • GriefLine Community and Family Services Inc. – anonymous Loss and Grief support services; Tel. Melb. Metro (03) 9935 7400 or National 1800 845 745 (12.00 noon and 3.00 a.m. seven days a week (including public holidays)

Things to remember

  • Allow your friend to talk and express their grief in whatever way they need to, providing it is not destructive.
  • Concentrate your efforts on listening carefully and with compassion.
  • If you're unsure of how to support your grieving friend, ask them to tell you.

You might also be interested in:

Want to know more?

Go to More information for support groups, related links and references.


This page has been produced in consultation with and approved by:

Centre for Grief Education

(Logo links to further information)


Centre for Grief Education

Last reviewed: January 2013

Content on this website is provided for education and information purposes only. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not imply endorsement and is not intended to replace advice from your doctor or other registered health professional. Content has been prepared for Victorian residents and wider Australian audiences, and was accurate at the time of publication. Readers should note that, over time, currency and completeness of the information may change. All users are urged to always seek advice from a registered health care professional for diagnosis and answers to their medical questions.


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Support for a grieving relative, friend or colleague is helpful, but can be hard. You can do many things to help someone who is grieving for a loved one. Make personal contact and attend the funeral or memorial service if you can. Practical help with things like housework, meals or shopping can help. If you don't know how to support someone who is grieving, ask them how you can help.



Content on this website is provided for education and information purposes only. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not imply endorsement and is not intended to replace advice from your qualified health professional. Content has been prepared for Victorian residence and wider Australian audiences, and was accurate at the time of publication. Readers should note that over time currency and completeness of the information may change. All users are urged to always seek advice from a qualified health care professional for diagnosis and answers to their medical questions.

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