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Sex - premature ejaculation

Summary

Premature ejaculation is a lack of control over ejaculation so that it often happens sooner than the man or his partner would want. Most men orgasm sooner than they would like from time to time. Premature ejaculation is only a problem if it happens frequently and it causes distress. There is a variety of treatments available, including exercises, therapy and drugs.

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Premature ejaculation is the most common sexual problem for men. It is a lack of control over ejaculation so that it often happens sooner than the man or his partner would want, causing distress for one or other of them.

Some men ejaculate as soon as foreplay starts. Others lose control when they try to insert their penis, while some ejaculate very quickly after penetration. Whatever the case, premature ejaculation can cause distress and create tension between a man and his partner.

Some men will have premature ejaculation from the time of their first sexual experience (life-long), while in others it will develop after a period of normal sexual activity (acquired).

Occasionally losing control over ejaculation is normal. Premature ejaculation is only a problem if it happens frequently. It’s important to remember that most men occasionally reach orgasm sooner than they’d like. For example, it is common for a man to ejaculate quickly the first time he has sex. It is also common if a man hasn’t ejaculated for a long time. The occasional loss of control doesn’t mean the man has a sexual problem.

Causes of premature ejaculation


In the past, premature ejaculation has been considered to be psychological. However, it is now thought that some men (particularly those with life-long premature ejaculation) have a chemical imbalance in the brain centres controlling this function. Some men have acquired premature ejaculation associated with erectile dysfunction.

Psychological factors are important and include:
  • depression or anxiety, particularly about performance
  • feeling anxious about rejection
  • expecting failure
  • negative sexual experiences in childhood
  • religious beliefs
  • stress
  • problems within the relationship.

Treatment for premature ejaculation


Seeking help from a doctor or sex therapist is a good idea. Treatments for premature ejaculation will vary depending on the cause and whether it is life-long or acquired premature ejaculation. The treatments include:
  • Behavioural techniquesthese include Semans’ ‘stop-start’ technique and Masters and Johnson’s ‘squeeze’ technique. Semans’ technique involves learning to control the sensations prior to ejaculation. The idea is to repeatedly bring yourself close to ejaculation, then stop and rest. If you do this often enough, you will learn to recognise your ‘point of no return’. The Masters and Johnson (named after the famed sex researchers) technique involves squeezing the end of the penis just before ejaculation to lessen the urge to ejaculate. These exercises can be done alone or with a partner.
  • Kegel exercises – these exercises are designed to strengthen the pelvic floor. To identify the muscles of your pelvic floor, stop yourself from urinating in midstream. This is the action you need to practice when your bladder is empty. Tightly contract the muscles and hold for 10 seconds. Repeat 10 times, three times a day.
  • Psychotherapy and counselling – with the guidance of an experienced sex therapist, any underlying anxieties about sex can be explored and eased.
  • Reducing penile sensation local anaesthetic gels and creams can be used to reduce penile sensation and should be applied 30 minutes before sexual intercourse. They should be used with a condom to prevent absorption by your partner. Using two condoms may also help.
  • SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) and tricyclic antidepressants a side effect of these medications is to slow ejaculation when used in men with depression. This effect may be helpful in men with premature ejaculation, and these medicines can be used in conjunction with counselling. Taking SSRIs can have other side effects such as decreased libido (sex drive), nausea, sweating, bowel disturbance and fatigue. Some SSRIs are taken daily. One SSRI (Dapoxetine) has recently been approved to be taken as required before sexual intercourse.
  • If the premature ejaculation is associated with erectile dysfunction, erectile dysfunction treatments such as PDE5 inhibitors (Viagra, Cialis, Levitra) can help restore control of ejaculation.

Where to get help

  • Your doctor

Things to remember

  • Premature ejaculation is the most common sexual problem in men.
  • Occasionally losing control is normal. Most men orgasm sooner than they would like from time to time.
  • There is a variety of treatments to choose from, including exercises, therapy and drugs.

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This page has been produced in consultation with and approved by:

Andrology Australia

(Logo links to further information)


Andrology Australia

Last reviewed: October 2013

Content on this website is provided for education and information purposes only. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not imply endorsement and is not intended to replace advice from your doctor or other registered health professional. Content has been prepared for Victorian residents and wider Australian audiences, and was accurate at the time of publication. Readers should note that, over time, currency and completeness of the information may change. All users are urged to always seek advice from a registered health care professional for diagnosis and answers to their medical questions.


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Premature ejaculation is a lack of control over ejaculation so that it often happens sooner than the man or his partner would want. Most men orgasm sooner than they would like from time to time. Premature ejaculation is only a problem if it happens frequently and it causes distress. There is a variety of treatments available, including exercises, therapy and drugs.



Content on this website is provided for education and information purposes only. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not imply endorsement and is not intended to replace advice from your qualified health professional. Content has been prepared for Victorian residence and wider Australian audiences, and was accurate at the time of publication. Readers should note that over time currency and completeness of the information may change. All users are urged to always seek advice from a qualified health care professional for diagnosis and answers to their medical questions.

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