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Ectopic pregnancy

Summary

Ectopic pregnancy is a pregnancy that develops outside the uterus, usually in one of the fallopian tubes. Symptoms can include cramping, abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. Pain may be caused by a ruptured tube, which is a medical emergency needing immediate surgery. Treatment for non-emergency ectopic pregnancy can include medication or surgery.

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During ovulation, an egg (ovum) is released from one of the ovaries. Conception occurs when the egg meets a sperm in the fallopian tube. Normally, the fertilised egg moves down the fallopian tube and into the uterus (womb) to implant in the uterine lining (endometrium).

Ectopic pregnancy is a pregnancy that develops outside the uterus, usually in one of the fallopian tubes. In almost all cases, the embryo dies. The developing placenta cannot access a rich blood supply and the fallopian tube is not large enough to support the growing embryo.

In one out of five cases, the tube ruptures, causing internal bleeding and shock. This is a medical emergency needing immediate surgery and, in some cases, a blood transfusion. In an emergency, call triple zero (000) for an ambulance or go immediately to the nearest hospital emergency department.

An ectopic pregnancy can also develop in the cervix (entrance to the womb), the abdominal cavity and the ovary itself, but these cases are rare. Around five in 1,000 pregnancies are ectopic.

Symptoms of ectopic pregnancy


The symptoms of ectopic pregnancy can mimic miscarriage or the symptoms of other reproductive disorders, such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or endometriosis. An ectopic pregnancy can first appear as a normal pregnancy.

The symptoms of ectopic pregnancy can include:
  • the usual signs of pregnancy, such as amenorrhoea (missed period), morning sickness and breast tenderness
  • pain in the lower abdomen
  • pain in the lower back
  • cramps on one side of the pelvis
  • vaginal bleeding or spotting
  • sudden and severe pain in the lower abdomen (if the fallopian tube ruptures).

Risk factors for ectopic pregnancy


Ectopic pregnancy is caused by a fertilised egg not being able to move through the fallopian tube. This can be caused by a blockage in the tube or because the tiny hairs inside the tube are not able to sweep the fertilised egg towards the uterus.

Factors that can increase a woman’s risk of having an ectopic pregnancy include:
  • tubal sterilisation, where the tubes are ‘tied’ as a permanent form of contraception
  • successful reversal of a tubal sterilisation
  • endometriosis
  • past infection with PID or salpingitis (inflammation of the fallopian tubes) and associated scarring
  • defects of the fallopian tube
  • use of assisted reproductive technologies
  • past ectopic pregnancy
  • damage to the fallopian tube caused by a ruptured appendix.

Contraception and ectopic pregnancy


The contraceptives currently available in Australia do not increase the risk of ectopic pregnancy. Intrauterine devices (IUDs) and the progestogen-only pill (mini pill) do not protect against ectopic pregnancy as effectively as other forms of contraception (such as the combined pill) and may be a less suitable choice for women at higher risk of ectopic pregnancy.

Women who use these forms of contraception need to be aware of the symptoms of ectopic pregnancy.

Diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy


Around one in five cases of ectopic pregnancy is diagnosed in the emergency room after the fallopian tube has ruptured. In most cases, ectopic pregnancy can be diagnosed using a range of tests, some of which are standard medical procedures for all pregnant women, including:
  • pelvic examination
  • blood tests
  • ultrasound
  • laparoscopy (‘keyhole’ surgery).

Treatment for ectopic pregnancy


A ruptured fallopian tube is a medical emergency. Laparoscopic (‘keyhole’) surgery is done to remove the embryo and attempts are made to repair the fallopian tube. A blood transfusion may also be needed.

For non-emergency ectopic pregnancy, medications are often successful, but sometimes surgery is still needed. Any woman thought to have or found to have an ectopic pregnancy will need careful observation. Most women who have had an ectopic pregnancy can become pregnant again, but they will need careful follow up, as their risk of ectopic pregnancy is higher.

Early screening for ectopic pregnancy is vital


Screening and developments in early pregnancy monitoring have considerably reduced the number of deaths from ectopic pregnancy. Women who are at high risk must be monitored closely during early pregnancy through blood tests and ultrasound.

It is important to tell your doctor if your medical history includes any of the known risk factors. You should also see your doctor immediately if you have unusual pregnancy symptoms such as cramping, pain or vaginal bleeding.

Risk reduction for ectopic pregnancy


Many cases of ectopic pregnancy are caused by scarring of the fallopian tubes. Suggestions on how to reduce your risk of fallopian tube damage include:
  • Treat any pelvic infection promptly.
  • Treat any sexually transmissible infection (STI) promptly.
  • Avoid STIs by always using a condom when having sex if the risk of an STI is at all possible.

Where to get help

  • In an emergency, call triple zero (000) for an ambulance or go immediately to your nearest hospital emergency department
  • Your doctor
  • Obstetrician

Things to remember

  • Ectopic pregnancy is a pregnancy that develops outside the uterus, usually in one of the fallopian tubes.
  • Symptoms can include cramping, abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding.
  • A ruptured fallopian tube is a medical emergency needing immediate treatment.

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This page has been produced in consultation with and approved by:

Family Planning Victoria

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Family Planning Victoria

Fact sheet currently being reviewed.
Last reviewed: May 2012

Content on this website is provided for education and information purposes only. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not imply endorsement and is not intended to replace advice from your doctor or other registered health professional. Content has been prepared for Victorian residents and wider Australian audiences, and was accurate at the time of publication. Readers should note that, over time, currency and completeness of the information may change. All users are urged to always seek advice from a registered health care professional for diagnosis and answers to their medical questions.


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Ectopic pregnancy is a pregnancy that develops outside the uterus, usually in one of the fallopian tubes. Symptoms can include cramping, abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. Pain may be caused by a ruptured tube, which is a medical emergency needing immediate surgery. Treatment for non-emergency ectopic pregnancy can include medication or surgery.



Content on this website is provided for education and information purposes only. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not imply endorsement and is not intended to replace advice from your qualified health professional. Content has been prepared for Victorian residence and wider Australian audiences, and was accurate at the time of publication. Readers should note that over time currency and completeness of the information may change. All users are urged to always seek advice from a qualified health care professional for diagnosis and answers to their medical questions.

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